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The Essential Guide to Doe Definitions

The Doe Team

by The Doe Team

| February 15, 2022
A complete and definitive guide to the vocabulary you’ll find on The Doe.

CONTENTS

Active Listening
Adaptability
Bias
Civil Discourse
Closeness
Curiosity
Doe Print
Echo Chamber
Emotional Intelligence
Empathy
Goodwill
Growth Mindset
Levelheadedness
Nonverbal Communication
Openness
Soft Skills
Stability
Parting Words

 


 

A complete and definitive guide to the vocabulary you’ll find on The Doe.

In this blog, we take a look at all the keywords you’ll find across our site, what they mean and why they matter when it comes to civil discourse. Let’s dive right in!

Active Listening

Active Listening

Definition:

Active listening is making a conscious effort to not just hear the words someone is saying to you but to understand and retain the information being shared with you. Active listening requires you to pay attention to another person. It means you are engaged with the other person and you are making them feel heard and valued. 

Why it matters:

Developing your active listening skills may be one of the best ways to improve all the relationships in your life, whether professional or personal. At work, it’s critical you understand and retain what your co-workers and your boss are telling you. It can save you from embarrassing mistakes, reduce misunderstanding and impress those around you, which will go a long way when it comes time for promotions. At home, active listening is valuable when your partner or a family member just needs to feel heard and understood. And in social situations, active listening can help you develop relationships with new people you meet.

Adaptability

Adaptability

Definition:

Adaptability is your ability or willingness to adjust your actions, course or approach in the face of change. Being adaptable at work is important when reacting to evolving tasks and responsibilities. Being adaptable in life means you are able to embrace the curveballs that life throws your way. It means you’re open and accepting that things will inevitably change. It doesn’t necessarily mean you’re an optimist, but it does mean you can tap into your emotional resilience in a rapidly changing environment. People who are adaptable can respond quickly when things don’t go as planned and are able to bounce back from setbacks. 

Why it matters:

If there’s one sure thing in life, it’s that things will change. Once you begin to approach life knowing that nothing stays the same, you can adopt a perspective that allows you to look for new opportunities for personal growth. Being aware that change is possible will help you embrace it, better understand it and be open to adapting when it comes into your life.

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Bias

Definition:

A bias is an unfair tendency, inclination or prejudice in favor of or against something or someone. Most of us acquire our biases from our upbringing and environment. They are also shaped by our socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, educational background and more.

Types of bias include (but are not limited to) similarity bias, confirmation bias, conformity bias and more.

Why it matters:

Biases influence how we make decisions and, if left unchecked, can cause us to make decisions without being aware of our prejudice. Part of successful discourse is learning to recognize, acknowledge and address the biases that help build up echo chambers. 

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Civil Discourse

Definition:

Civil” has many different meanings, and in this context, it refers to a deeper sense of tact and diplomacy that forms the foundation on which democratic societies work. It’s about displaying behaviors that contribute to good citizenship. Meanwhile, “discourse” refers to the communication of thoughts through words and conversations or a formal discussion of a subject in speech or writing.

Here at The Doe, we define civil discourse as:

  • A respectful exchange of thoughts and opinions.
  • An engagement between two or more parties to achieve better understanding.
  • A courteous discussion that does not necessarily conclude with an agreement or solution.

Why it matters:

Civil discourse involves a mutual sharing of views in a dialogue. The goal is to promote greater understanding among the parties through respectful and engaging conversations without rancor. These exchanges aim to create space that includes and recognizes different perspectives, opinions, experiences and identities.

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Closeness

Definition:

According to the Cambridge Dictionary, closeness refers to “the quality of knowing someone very well, liking them a lot and wanting to spend a lot of time together.” Closeness evokes the feeling of connection and belonging, often from positive and supportive interpersonal relationships. If you score high on closeness in our personality assessment, you relish being connected to family and setting up a home—basic human needs we all thrive on at varying degrees.

Why it matters:

When we feel loved, supported and encouraged by those around us, our lives are enriched. We flourish with the support of others. We feel empowered and motivated to return the favor. Closeness also helps us become more resilient to adversity. When we’re connected with others, we’re more willing to hear their ideas, opinions and perspectives—teaching us how to better engage with new ideas.

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Curiosity

Definition:

Curiosity is a state of active interest that stems from a strong desire to learn or know about a topic, even though you may not have any practical use for the information acquired. In our Doe Prints quiz, we define curiosity as a need to “discover, find out and grow.”

People who value curiosity ask questions and seek answers for the sake of growing their knowledge. They’re more likely to actively look for challenges and new experiences to expand their worldview.

Why it matters:

Curiosity boosts our observation power and supports our intellectual development. It helps us connect the dots among information from various sources and supports creative problem-solving by seeing new possibilities. Being curious about people around us can foster social relationships, cultivate empathy and build deep connections with others.

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Doe Print

Definition:

Your Doe Print is a unique representation of five characteristic values: openness, goodwill, curiosity, stability and closeness. Your Doe Print is determined by our Doe Prints quiz—a personality quiz that analyzes your basic worldview using natural language processing.

Why it matters:

Being able to identify and understand who you are and what you value is the first step to recognizing what can be done to broaden your worldview. Once your Doe Print is defined, you’ll also gain access to custom narrative recommendations curated specifically for your value score. Some of these recommended narratives might totally resonate with you. Some of them might evoke strong emotions. Some might even infuriate or terrify you. It’ll be a mixed bag, and that’s the point.

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Echo Chamber

Definition:

An echo chamber is an environment (virtual or real life) where similar information, ideas and beliefs are amplified or reinforced while different or competing views are censored. 

We create a media echo chamber when we hear the same perspectives and opinions repeatedly, despite the availability of information from various sources. For example, many people follow social media accounts that reflect and reinforce their beliefs. They trap themselves in an echo chamber by surrounding themselves with people who hold the same opinions and only reading materials that validate their points of view.

Why it matters:

Echo chambers can disseminate misinformation and distort our perspective, making it difficult to consider opposing viewpoints and discuss complex topics. They prevent us from gaining exposure to various opinions and perspectives that support meaningful civil discourse, broaden our worldview and fuel our personal development.

Emotional Intelligence

Emotional Intelligence

Definition:

While the ability to express and control your emotions is an important part of functioning in the world, it’s the ability to identify, understand and manage your own emotions that defines emotional intelligence. Some psychologists believe that your emotional intelligence, also referred to as emotional quotient (EQ), is perhaps even more important than your IQ when it comes to successfully navigating relationships in life. Emotional intelligence is made up of four different levels: 

  • Perceiving emotions: The first step in understanding emotions is to perceive them accurately.
  • Reasoning with emotions: The next step involves using emotions to promote thinking and cognitive activity.
  • Understanding emotions: The emotions that we perceive can carry a wide variety of meanings.
  • Managing emotions: The ability to manage emotions effectively is a crucial part of emotional intelligence and the highest level.

Why it matters:

You may not realize it, but your emotional intelligence plays an important role in everything you do. From resilience to motivation and empathy to stress management, emotional intelligence facilitates our capacity to read people and situations and then how to navigate our way around all kinds of social situations. EQ can help you think before you react to something out of anger; it can empower you with greater self-awareness; and it can help you develop empathy for those around you. Being able to understand, identify and manage emotions can not only improve your own well-being but can also lead to improved relationships with those around you.

Empathy

Empathy

Definition:

Empathy is the ability to understand another person’s emotions and see things from their perspective, allowing you to imagine or experience what they may be thinking or feeling. While empathy doesn’t necessarily come naturally for everyone, it is a skill you can cultivate and develop so that it becomes more intuitive. 

Why it matters:

There is power in practicing and developing your empathy. It’s one of the most important facets of creating strong relationships and enhancing your own emotional intelligence. Empathy can help us connect with other people, which is critical to our psychological and physical well-being. It can help you regulate your own emotions, and, perhaps most importantly, empathy can also promote helping behaviors toward others.

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Goodwill

Definition:

Our Doe Prints quiz defines goodwill as “a value that indicates the tendency to show concern for the welfare and interests of others.” When you show concern for others, you consider their needs and challenges while taking a genuine interest in their feelings, capabilities and perspectives. From there, you can offer assistance from a place of integrity, respect and compassion to support them in challenging situations and contribute to their welfare.

Why it matters:

Compassion toward other people’s welfare, feelings and perspectives helps you examine issues through their lenses. You become more attuned to the world around you as you broaden your worldview. Not to mention, we can often learn something new about ourselves and the world when we step into circumstances that we don’t encounter in our own lives.

Growth Mindset

Growth Mindset

Definition:

Adopting a growth mindset means you are open to being challenged, and with those challenges, you seek to learn what you can from the conversation or experience. If you have a growth mindset, you believe that you are capable of growing your talents and abilities through effort and persistence. Basically, someone with a growth mindset believes that with effort, good teaching and persistence, they can change, grow and improve. 

Why it matters:

How you think about yourself and your ability to grow and change plays a critical role in how you choose to approach life, especially any challenges that may arise. As a student, a growth mindset can help you develop a hunger to learn and a drive to work harder and discover new things. As an adult, a growth mindset can determine how you handle setbacks. It can mean that in the face of a problem, rather than giving up, you see it as an opportunity to learn and grow who you are. If you believe you can change and grow and learn, then you are more likely to look for ways to improve your skills instead of giving up.

Levelheadedness

Levelheadedness

Definition:

Levelheadedness is the ability to be self-composed and sensible and not swayed by your emotions. To be levelheaded means you are able to think logically regardless of the external conditions, circumstances or events around you. Levelheadedness allows you to respond to things in a calm, confident and logical manner, as opposed to being driven by your passions or whims. 

Why it matters:

Not being ruled by your emotions can be liberating, not only from a decision-making perspective but also in the way you choose to live your life. By practicing levelheadedness, you are choosing not to overreact to stress (which is inevitable), and you are choosing to respond to life’s ups and downs with a more objective frame of mind. It can lead to better mental and emotional well-being, a sense of calm and confidence and, ultimately, stronger emotional resilience.

Non Verbal Communication

Nonverbal Communication

Definition:

You may not realize, but a significant portion of the way you communicate with others is unspoken. Not only are you communicating with nonverbal cues but you’re likely picking up nonverbal cues from others. Everything from body language, posture, facial expressions, eye gaze, gestures and tone of voice are sending messages to other people, without you having to say a thing. 

Why it matters:

Nonverbal communication plays an important role in how we convey meaning and important information to those around us. It not only helps others to better understand what you are trying to say but it can help you interpret those around you. Being aware of your own nonverbal cues is important in ensuring others are receiving the message you are actually intending for them. Nonverbal communication can provide valuable insight into how someone might be feeling or receiving the information you may be sharing with them. It can teach you a lot about how to approach people in all kinds of social situations.

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Openness

Definition:

The Doe Prints assessment defines openness as the tendency to emphasize independent action, thought and feeling, as well as a readiness for new experiences and different activities.

People with a high openness score are typically more curious. They tend to seek out different experiences and are comfortable with unfamiliar situations. They’re also more likely to be in touch with their inner feelings and enjoy surprises.

Why it matters:

When you’re open to experience, you’re more likely to be creative, seek out learning opportunities and devise novel solutions to problems.

Openness also correlates with well-being and overall happiness. It fosters positivity and personal relationships. In short, being open to experience can enhance your life, teach you to engage with new ideas and help break down your echo chamber.

Soft Skills

Soft Skills

Definition:

Soft skills are interpersonal skills that encompass a wide range of personality traits that are often harder to measure or quantify. Unlike hard skills, which include specific technical or job-related skills, soft skills are often described as falling under the umbrella term of emotional intelligence. Common soft skills include:

  • Active listening
  • Nonverbal communication
  • Growth mindset
  • Adaptability
  • Levelheadedness
  • Empathy

Why it matters:

The development of soft skills determines how well you relate to or interact with other people. While soft skills can be some of the most challenging to develop for some, they can be learned. Much like learning hard skills, soft skills also require practice. Unlike hard skills, however, soft skills are harder to measure. The proof shows up in how well you are able to manage your relationships with others.

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Stability

Definition:

Stability is the state of being consistent in your beliefs and behaviors. It's the desire to maintain order and predictability in life. Those who have a high stability score in our personality assessment favor the sensible and the tried and tested. They seek equivalence in the physical world when dealing with concepts and ideas. Their actions are more predictable, which can make others around them feel safe and secure. They can be the voice of comfort and reason in an insecure or unstable environment.

Why it matters:

Curiosity and stability are two sides of the same coin. Without curiosity, we become stagnant. Without stability, we can lose our point of reference. It’s crucial to fully understand who you are, what you believe and how your values influence your worldview before you can really do the work to step out of your echo chamber.

Parting Words

Breaking down your echo chamber starts with understanding. Bookmark this page for easy reference, revisit for new and updated definitions and subscribe to our blog for more valuable resources related to keywords like these.

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